Small Businesses Must Comply with E-Verify by January 1

GREENVILLE, SC. — On January 1, 2012, every hiring employer in South Carolina must be in compliance with the recently passed E-Verify legislation.

The challenge, according to HR consultant Susan E. Crocker, is that many small businesses are not even familiar with E-Verify. That lack of knowledge could get them into trouble, in the form of audits, suspension of licenses or even closure.

“Every owner of a hiring business has to comply with E-Verify,” says Mrs. Crocker. “But in addition, business registration forms also ask the employer to conform as well. We’re here to make sure employers are able to comply and to sleep well at night.”

The result of extended debate and coordination between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration, E-Verify is a new way to confirm an employee’s eligibility to work within the United States. It replaces the former reliance on I-9 form alone.

Legislation was passed on July 11, 2011 and takes effect based on a timetable set by individual states. South Carolina, for instance, requires compliance by January 1, 2012, while North Carolina’s law takes effect in October of 2012.

Employers can handle the E-Verify system on their own, but there is a substantial learning curve involved. In order to comply with the program in-house, a business needs to review more than 30 hours of tutorials, updates, seminars and webinars. For most small businesses, that kind of time and effort is unrealistic.

Another option for businesses is to work through a third party provider who has already completed the tutorials and who has kept up with the updates. E-Verify Experts, LLC is at this point unique in offering the service, and it does so with both the necessary compliance and a strong background in HR expertise.

Susan E. Crocker and Wanda S. Boyd began E-Verify Experts after an invitation from legislators to meet the imminent need for small businesses to comply.

For a given employee or prospective hire, E-Verify could be a simple process or a surprising challenge. Wanda Boyd is the company’s E-Verify technical expert, and it is her role to E-Verify employees and work through the confirmation stage.

“You hope to get a final confirmation that closes the case,” says Mrs. Boyd. “But sometimes you receive a tentative non-confirmation that means the employee is either ineligible to work in the US, or that their documentation or records are incorrect. Few employers want to handle such a technical process. We are the specialists in this area.”

For more information on E-Verify legislation or the dates of necessary compliance, visit www.uscis.gov/everify. For more information on E-Verify Experts, their services and free audit of current I-9 forms, visit www.everifyexperts.com or call (864) 234-9950.

See 46 other posts submitted by Beth Honshell. Find articles, people, and videos related to: e-verify, employee hiring eligibility, I-9 forms